Vet offers tips for puppy-proofing house for new pet owners

Photo: WKRN

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WKRN) – If you’re planning to get a new pup for Christmas, you might want to think about puppy-proofing your home.

News 2 spoke with Veterinarian Karen Foster who said puppies are attracted to pretty much anything new that looks interesting.

“Electric cords can be a big issue with puppies. They’ll come and want to chew on the cord and they can electrocute themselves,” explained Dr. Foster.

Photo: WKRN
Photo: WKRN

She also said puppies may like children’s toys just as much as your kids do.

She said if they swallow small toys, it can cause a stomach obstruction.

She also added socks and shoes need to be kept in a place where your puppy can’t get to them.

“It’s very common for puppies to swallow socks. I have done multiple operations to remove socks from dog’s stomachs,” said Dr. Foster.

Not only is that costly, but it’s also painful for your dog.

Dr. Foster also said dogs should only be fed dog food and treats.

“Sugar-free gum may contain xylitol that can cause hypoglycemia and liver problems,” she said.

A more common stocking stuffer is chocolate, everybody’s favorite.

And it only takes one or two grapes or raisins to be ingested to cause kidney failure.

Photo: WKRN

“Onions can cause anemia, so do not feed any table scraps to your pets,” she said.

It’s also important to watch puppies closely when they’re outside.

According to the U.S. Humane Society, more than 700 types of plants are poisonous if your pet eats them, including poinsettias, which many of us have around the holidays.

When your puppy’s outside, veterinarians recommend they be kept in a fenced-in area, or on a leash.

When they’re inside, anything you don’t want your puppy getting their paws on should be kept in an area they can’t get to.

If you aren’t able to monitor your puppy, Dr. Foster suggests using baby gates or dog crates.

The puppies featured in the above video are up for adoption.

If you want to adopt one for Christmas, call Agape Animal Rescue at 615-406-7799, or visit agaperescue.org.

Dr. Foster can be reached at 615-513-4449 or by visiting drfostersmobilepetclinic.com.

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