Boy, 12, charged with 1st-degree murder in Nebraska shooting

Jarrell Milton
This is an undated booking photo of Jarrell Milton from the Omaha Police Department. (Courtesy: ABC News)

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — A 12-year-old boy has been charged with first degree murder in the fatal shooting of a man in Omaha, Nebraska.

The boy is one of three suspects charged in the June 29 shooting near Miller Park that killed 31-year-old Jamymell Ray. Two other suspects, aged 15 and 17, were arrested last week.

All three have been charged with first-degree murder and various weapons counts.

Tipped off by investigators in Omaha, the U.S. Marshal’s office in Minneapolis conducted surveillance at several homes in the city, and eventually spotted the 12-year-old boy walking on a street around 11:30 p.m. Tuesday, Omaha police said in a statement.

He was arrested without incident and is expected to be extradited to Nebraska, police said.

Prosecutors say Ray was shot when the boy and two teens lured him and another man to the area on the premise of a marijuana deal, and that the young men had planned a robbery.

It is not yet clear who shot Ray, but prosecutors say all three boys showed the men guns and at least two weapons were fired during the attack. Police have found two guns and are looking for a third, Douglas County Attorney Don Kleine said Tuesday.

The other man, 30-year-old Charles Fisher, was wounded, and authorities say the 17-year-old is suspected of shooting him at close range.

Court documents including arrest affidavits have been sealed from public view, which is common in Nebraska for suspects under the age of 18. The Associated Press generally does not name juveniles accused of crimes.

John Jedlicka, a public defender appointed to represent the 17-year-old suspect, said Wednesday that he had not seen the arrest documents and that it was too early to say whether he’d seek to have the case transferred to juvenile court.

A Douglas County prosecutor, Jim Masteller, said Wednesday that a change in state law that took effect Jan. 1 requires anyone under 14 to be charged in juvenile court, meaning the 12-year-old suspect cannot be tried as an adult.

Online court records do not indicate that the 12-year-old suspect has an attorney.

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