Incredible ‘red’ northern lights shine Tuesday

Another is on the way

From International Space Station June 22. (Courtesy: Scott Kelly)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WKRN) – On Tuesday night, an incredible “red” northern lights, or aurora borealis, occurred.

Vivid shades of red were captured in a photo snapped from the International Space Station 250 miles up.

Courtesy: Chris Cook
Courtesy: Chris Cook

The red is said to be caused by excited nitrogen and oxygen in the upper atmosphere.

Nitrogen’s wavelength is in the 630 nm range (red) and oxygen is similar.

It is common to see a red Aurora from orbit, but a little more unusual to see red Northern Lights from the ground.

According to SpaceWeather.com, NASA recorded another solar flare from the same sunspot that occurred at 2:23 p.m. EDT on Tuesday.

This should reach earth by June 24 creating more great northern lights.

oxygen-sectrum

nitrogen-spectrum

 

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