Food trucks could be banned from new Sounds ballpark

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WKRN) – A proposed ordinance would prohibit the sale of food and goods around the First Tennessee Park.

The ordinance, cosponsored by council members Anthony Davies (District 7) and Erica Gilmore (District 19), is scheduled to be introduced for first reading next Tuesday.

It states, “Such sale or offering for sale of food, goods or personal property is prohibited upon the streets and sidewalks in the area of the Metropolitan Government surround [sic] the Nashville Baseball Park.”

Nashville food trucks
The area in question is Jefferson Street between Third and Fifth avenues, Harrison Street between Third and Fifth avenues, and Third and Fifth avenues between Jackson and Harrison Street.

The area in question is Jefferson Street between Third and Fifth avenues, Harrison Street between Third and Fifth avenues, and Third and Fifth avenues between Jackson and Harrison Street.

If passed, it could impact food trucks and their businesses because they often park on Metro’s streets and serve customers on nearby sidewalks.

However, the Nashville Food Truck Association (NFTA) said its members are not concerned about the proposed ordinance hurting their business.

“Nashville has got so many great locations,” NFTA President Dallas Shaw said. “Just not being able to park next to the stadium is ok because there are plenty of local businesses in the stadium to feed the hungry people.”

He continued, “We are fine; we have plenty of places we can park. We can park downtown; we can park at the farmers market.”

The food truck industry is growing. NFTA added 12 new members this year, bringing the total number to 50 within Nashville.

A Little Italian
A Little Italian

A Little Italian is one of the new ones. Its owner Tia Mirenda opened her mobile restaurant a month ago.

“I’ve always loved to cook and I’ve always wanted to have my own business,” she said. “My family is Italian. My great grandparents are immigrants.”

Ragab Rashawn is from Egypt. He came to visit Nashville to see his wife’s family after they married in New York.

He decided to stay and bring his successful food truck business, King Tut’s, from New York to Nashville.

“I got surprised by the people in Nashville because they are really open to cultural food,” he said. “The chefs on other food trucks bring out everything they can do to make sure the food is quality, tasty and from local ingredients.”

The ordinance would also include the prohibition of re-selling of tickets.

If a person is convicted of violating the ordinance, they face a fine of between $25 and $50 per item if they are convicted of selling.

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