Remember the song ‘Last Train to Clarksville?’

Remember the song 'Last Train to Clarksville?' (Image 1)
Remember the song 'Last Train to Clarksville?' (Image 1)

Those words could one day be heard again if there were ever rail service between Nashville and the ever-growing city of Clarksville.

It’s been a dream ride for some in Clarksville, but there will soon be a new study looking at a commuter passenger train as a transportation option for the Nashville-Clarksville corridor.

The study was announced Tuesday in a news release from Mayor Kim McMillan’s office.

The $1.2 million study will be conducted over the next year by the worldwide design firm of Parsons Binkerhoff, Inc.

“For many years people have asked about the feasibility to have a commuter passenger rail line between Nashville and Clarksville, and I believe now that with this latest study, we’ll possibly make that dream a reality,” Mayor McMillan told News 2 on Wednesday.

She said the study will look at various transportation options between the two cities such as widening I-24 or expanding the popular Park & Ride Regional Transportation commuter bus that goes directly between Nashville and Clarksville three times daily.

The eye-catching part of the study centers on the potential commuter train that might be similar to the present Music City Star that operates for commuters in the Donelson/Hermitage area and extends to Lebanon in neighboring Wilson County.

Many of the questions to be answered by the study would center on the existing rail lines between Clarksville and Nashville.

“Could they be used and how much new rail would have to be built,” said Mayor McMillan.

She added that it would be way too soon to suggest where people would get on or off a potential commuter train between the two cities.

The mayor thinks people would support it because she points to the success of Clarksville Park & Ride and the number of people commuting to Clarksville from the Nashville area because of the availability of jobs.

Clarksville is considered one of the fastest growing areas in the country with a population that has mushroomed from 100,000 in 2000 to 150,000 now.

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