Facebook Messenger uproar serves as reminder to read terms, conditions

Facebook Messenger uproar serves as reminder to read terms, conditions (Image 1)
Facebook Messenger uproar serves as reminder to read terms, conditions (Image 1)

Facebook fans are being forced to download an app to send messages through the popular social media service.

Users can no longer send messages through the original Facebook app and must now use Facebook Messenger, an entirely different app.

While upset at the change in general, many fans are more concerned about privacy.

Facebook Messenger can find accounts on the device, read through contacts, know where your device is, edit and read text messages, directly call phone numbers, modify and delete photos as well as other media, take pictures and videos, change audio settings… and the list goes on.

What users don’t know, however, is that nearly every app someone downloads asks for permission to do the exact same things.

But there’s little to worry about.

The reason why is because Facebook Messenger needs permission to find accounts so it can link to Facebook. It has to read contacts on your device so it can send messages to them. If it doesn’t have permission to directly call phone numbers, you couldn’t make a call without giving permission every time.

If it doesn’t have access to your photos and videos, you couldn’t share them with Facebook friends.

If it doesn’t have permission to record audio, you couldn’t send voice messages or videos.

The same permissions have been given to every social media app you’ve downloaded.

Along with that, if you log into apps through Facebook, you’d be even more surprised as what you grant those apps to do: You’ve given the company permission to use anything you post from your birthday, to your e-mail address, to your profile picture, right down to when and where you took that picture.

It’s a reminder that before you click “okay” or “accept” when given Terms and Conditions to take the time to read them.

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