Swarms of bees could become bigger problem

Swarms of bees could become bigger problem (Image 1)
Swarms of bees could become bigger problem (Image 1)

 As the weather warms up, more and more Middle Tennesseans are seeing swarms of bees in their yards.

While they won’t go out of their way to sting you, and will probably leave in a day or two, they can be bothersome and could lead to bigger problems.

Arrington, Tennessee resident Mike Caldwell returned home Easter Sunday to a swarm of bees in his backyard.

“We looked in the back, and on this Kwanzan Cherry Tree, [the bees were] literally growing almost exponentially in the moments that followed,” he told News 2, adding, “ It was like 12 inches at first, got to 18 inches, then we estimated it was around 24 inches [of bees] at its height and then as quickly as they came, they left.”

So where did they go?

Beekeper Jim Garrison says bees send out scout bees to find a hole in a tree or the side of a house to build a more permanent nest. 

Then, usually about 24 to 48 hours later, they find a place they all live and leave for their new home.

Garrison says it becomes a problem if that place is your home.

He says once bees build their new home, it’s permanent and they could be there for years.

It is recommended homeowners hire a beekeper to remove the bees for good.

Mike Studer with the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency says you must remove the honeycomb and clean the area.  If you don’t, the old honey will rot and smell and could drip down into other areas of the house.

For more information on swarms of bees, visit Beekepers of Middle Tennessee or the Tennessee Beekeepers Association.

For bee removal in Williamson County call Jim Garrison at 615-330-0105 or Jay Williams at 310-990-5074.  In Davidson County call Benny Kirby at 615-360-8051.

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